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Under your bewitching caress (Под чарующей лаской твоею), romance
 

 
 
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Label Transcription:

Duplicates fundPre-Revolutionary recordings 
E. BERLINER'S GRAMOPHONE
Russian - Mez-Soprano
23121 --- 287x-B-2z
Подъ чарующей лаской
Зубовъ
А.Д.Вяльцева
St.Petersburg

from Alexander Proidakov collection.
Mirror Transcription: 23121 --- 287x-B-2z
Additional information: Скан этикетки самого первого выпуска Вяльцевой 23121, с аукциона Курта Наука (аукцион # 23, июнь 1998, лот 38).

Описание: Десятидюймовые пластинки представленные компанией "Граммофон" в конце 1900/начале 1901, были идентичны 7" Берлинерам. Вскоре они были заменены дисками, имевшими бумажные этикетки. (Ten-inch records were introduced by the Gramophone Company in late 1900/early 1901, and the very first were identical in apearance to standard 7" Berliners discs. Within a short period of time, however, these were replaced with discs bearing paper G.&T. labels.)
Original matrix: Gramophone Co. # 287x
Label Catalog No Mx/Ctr No Take Order No Censorial No Additional information
Gramophone Co. > E.Berliner Gramophone 23121 287x First edition??
Single-sided record
Gramophone Co. > Concert (Angel) 23121 287x First edition?? Base fund
Gramophone Co. > Concert (Angel) 23121 287x First edition?? Base fund
Title Name: Under your bewitching caress
Language(s) or Ethnics: russian | Catalog category: Mezzo-Soprano with Piano | Genre (Music Category): Romance
Artist(s): Anastasiya Vyaltseva
Composer: Nikolai V. Zubov
Lyrics By:
Accompaniment Type: Piano
Bandmaster or conductor:
Recording Place: St.-Petersburg | Recording Date: 1901
Transfer speed:
Record size: 25 cm
Additional keywords:  
File size: 751.3 KB | 1000x1000 px
Hits: 2849 | Downloads: 16
Added by: horseman | 30.10.2012 07:22 | Last updated by:  bernikov | 30.10.2012 10:42
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Artistic value: 0.00 (0 votes)
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Label quality: 0.00 (0 votes)
 
Found: 18 comment(s) on 2 page(s). Displayed: comment 11 to 18.
 
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Author Comment
Adrian
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Comments: 495
Join Date: 03.07.2009
When the company first developed 10 inch records they immediately sent the equipment on a recording tour. For this reason the first 10" recordings we see are Russian. When they came back to Britain it was in late 1901 by which time the large flush labels were in use, and the first British recordings started in the high 900s in the G series (later b series).

Obviously it's likely that some 10" records were recorded in London before the tour, even if they were only experimental. There are some British 10" Berliners, but they are so rare that many people have said they didn't exist. I've seen two but never took the matrix numbers. I have the feeling they date from late 1901 but I cannot explain why they were produced without labels, or if any were issued commercially like that.

This above is from memory and may be quite wrong in detail. Kelly Perkins etc will have written the full information somewhere.
  24.11.2012 12:04
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Konezni
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Comments: 647
Join Date: 24.03.2012
French 10" Berliner
At least one non Russian 10" Berliner exists: 671 G (33141) Agussol LES HUGUENOTS Nobles seigneurs.
  24.11.2012 15:34
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sobinovv
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German 10" Berliner
Adrian wrote:

Obviously it's likely that some 10" records were recorded in London before the tour, even if they were only experimental. There are some British 10" Berliners, but they are so rare that many people have said they didn't exist. I've seen two but never took the matrix numbers.

A number of 10" Berliners were recorded in April 1901 in London by the violinist J. Jacobs and the Municipal Military Band. I am sure you have seen two of those.

I have seen Russian, French, Italian and German 10" Berliner records. One of these (G.C.-44052, mx. 42x-B, Gertrud Runge + Werner Alberti; Duett from La Traviata, recorded in August 1901 in Berlin) I have in my collection. German 10" Berliner stampers were ready in late September 1901.

The latest 10" Berliner I have seen was recorded on 6 February 1902 in Baku, Azerbayzhan. Its stamper was ready in mid-March, at the earliest.
  24.11.2012 18:12
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Adrian
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Comments: 495
Join Date: 03.07.2009
Yes, Jacobs rings a bell. I've since found and re-read Howard Friedman's article on Musicweb. It's interesting to see that these Jacobs ones are so early, with matrix numbers in the 100s.

The ones I have seen were a John Morton and a Perceval Allen. Kelly lists a 10" Morton, matrix 1053 R with the comment (Berliner) so it may have been this one that I saw. It's dated just '-01'. I suspect that the Allen I saw was also late 1901. She made published 10" records with matrix numbers from 975.

Clearly British 10" Berliners are rare even by the standards of European ones, as for most months of their existence the equipment was abroad. I've heard more than one experienced collector (one a distinguished discographer) suspect that reports of their existence were mistaken, though that was thirty years ago or more.

The Baku record is surprising if, as I believe, nearly all the British 10" recordings of November 1901 were issued with labels. Could the non-Latin script of Azerbaijani have had anything to do with it, or were all details in Western type?
  24.11.2012 23:41
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Adrian
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Comments: 495
Join Date: 03.07.2009
It seems to me most likely that if they forgot to order the labels from the printer or the printer was late supplying them, they just punched up a Berliner stamper! Within a few weeks, somebody senior in London or Hanover would have ordered that all 10 inch records must have paper labels.

From what I have read, the embossing would only generate a single stamper with a maximum pressing run of say 500 copies, so later issues would be flush and labelled. Perceval Allen was a good seller and sold more than they could then generate from a single wax, so many of her titles are later recordings with the same catalogue number suffixed x, and I believe z for a third rerecording.

I imagine it's true that seven inch records were issued as Berliners for some time after all ten inch records had labels. I can't remember ever seeing a 7" record with a flush label.

Please add and correct, as usual I'm working from memory.
  28.11.2012 12:15
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sobinovv
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Adrian wrote:

From what I have read, the embossing would only generate a single stamper with a maximum pressing run of say 500 copies, so later issues would be flush and labelled.

It was often possible to re-plate the wax to get several stampers. They pressed a maximum of about 1000 copies from each stamper.
Adrian wrote:

I imagine it's true that seven inch records were issued as Berliners for some time after all ten inch records had labels. I can't remember ever seeing a 7" record with a flush label.

There are 7" G&T records with flush label, but I have never seen one with label and smooth reverse side (all bear the Writing Angel). After my estimation paper labels were introduced on 7" G&T discs in (late?) autumn 1902.

By the way, European 7" Zonophone discs with paper label already came out in September 1901.
  29.11.2012 01:41
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Adrian
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In other words, there were still Berliners being produced until near the end of 1902? Really surprising, as late Berliners are so much rarer than early 10 inch G&Ts.

Part of it could be that they became 'visibly obsolete' earlier than other types, and were therefore more prone to being thrown away.
  29.11.2012 23:34
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sobinovv
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Adrian wrote:
In other words, there were still Berliners being produced until near the end of 1902?

Yes, but only 7" Berliner discs.

The last 10" Berliners disappeared in early spring 1902. They are extremely rare for one reason: How many European gramophonists in late 1901/early 1902 had a machine which could play 10" discs?
  01.12.2012 01:09
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